Friday, December 15, 2017

Something to think on …

The public has a distorted view of science because children are taught in school that science is a collection of firmly established truths. In fact, science is not a collection of truths. It is a continuing exploration of mysteries.
— Freeman Dyson, born on this date in 1923

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Listen in …

 Episode 248 – Cullen Murphy – The Virtual Memories Show.

“The cartoonists in that community were very intent on making their own way in life with the tools they enjoyed working with, rather than being slotted into a pathway of someone else’s devising.”

Anniversary …

 Paul Davis On Crime: Sock It To Me: 'Rowan And Martin's Laugh-In: The Complete Series' Released By Time/Life.

The details …

 A Close Reading of the Best Opening Paragraph of All Time | Literary Hub. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Mark thy calendar …

GREEN LINE CAFÉ POETRY BOOK FAIR FOR THE HOLIDAYS

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On Tuesday Evening, December 19, 2017, 7-8:30 PM.

The Green Line Poetry Series Will Present

A Small Fair Of Poetry Books (Specially Priced For The Event)

And Poets Happy To Inscribe Books For You


There Will Be Holiday Refreshments

And Short Holiday-Inspired Readings By The Poets


HOSTED BY
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THE GREEN LINE CAFE IS LOCATED
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* IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN SELLING BOOKS AT THIS EVENT
CONTACT LEONARD ASAP – gontarek9@earthlink.net  *

RIP …

 Longtime editor of American Poetry Review, 'the Poetry Don' dies at 68. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

The music of words …

Mr. Minto quoted Mr. Gass as claiming: “There are no descriptions in fiction, there are only constructions” (Fiction and the Figures of Life).
Ah, but I have a story to tell, characters to create, a plot to contrive, you may, with incautious confidence, insist. No. That’s what moviemakers do. They make hokum. You do not tell a story; your fiction will do that when your fiction is finished. What you make is music, and because your sounds are carriers of concepts, you make conceptual music too (Temple of Texts).

The whole thing is poetic …

 W.H. Auden Wrote Poetry For a Beautiful Short Film About Running | Literary Hub. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Director Don Owen’s filmmaking is sleek and stylistic, but the form never overtakes the subject. Runner is Kidd’s story, and he’s a great athletic subject: a young dreamer, driven to succeed. The camera often moves from his face to his feet, both guided by a mix of optimism and focus. He would go on to shatter 15 Canadian records, and a few American records as well, including one when he beat New Zealand’s Murray Halberg, the 1960 5,000 meter Olympic champion.

Take a look at these …

… Top 25 Photos on Flickr in 2017 From Around The World | Flickr Blog. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Good for them …

… University of Illinois cracks down on 'heckler's veto'.

Hmm …

 Top 10 novels about God | Books | The Guardian. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

I've read three of these. O'Connor's is a short story, not a novel. Fundamentalists' complaints regarding Kazantzakis's novel — which I doubt many fundamentalists have read— have more to do, I think, with Martin Scorsese's ghastly film version of it. Burgess's novel is a favorite of mine, but I would summarize it differently.

In case you wondered …

… Why Do So Many Celebrities Ignore Science? | RealClearScience.



Another question is why anybody gives a damn what they think.

Something to think on …

Readers themselves, I think, contribute to a book. They add their own imaginations, and it is as though the writer only gave them something to work on, and they did the rest.
— Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, who died on this date in 1953

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

'Twas ever thus …

… 20011: Worldwide.

Hear, hear …

… Informal Inquiries : "There is no Frigate like a Book" (c. 1873).

No contest …

… The Lord's Prayer: Guardini vs Bergoglio — Maureen Mullarkey. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Guardini probes deeper, penetrating to the core of the traditional phrase.

Hip and faithful ……

… Hooray For The Hillbilly Thomists | The American Conservative. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Have a look …

… Best Books for Young Readers 2017 on Vimeo.

Watch and listen …

… About Last Night | Snapshot: the Mills Brothers perform “Tiger Rag”.

A fan's biogrpahy …

 Anthony Powell would purr if he could read this shrewd, fond biography by Hilary Spurling. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Although a distinguished book critic himself, not least for these pages, Powell held journalists in the same regard as reviewers ("stupid, incompetent, often envious, rarely grasping the point of any given book"). Private Eye parodied his posture like this: "20th January 1995. Re-read various fan letters confirming that I am the leading novelist of my generation. Why is it, one wonders, that my fans are so unusually percipient?… Re-read Hamlet by Shakespeare, a competent but unreliable author, though by now rather dated and always prone to worthiness. Never to my knowledge managed a novel."

How we grew …

… Informal Inquiries : Blood and Thunder (2006).



Here is my review of a Polk biography.

Something to think on…

God cannot be compared to anything. Note this.
— Maimonides, who died on this date in 1204

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Worth noting …

 Expert comment: Charles Dickens letter underlines impact of rail crash on author - University of Kent.

And another …

… Informal Inquiries : 1st motel ($1.25 a night) opens on 12 December 1925.

Anniversary …

 Informal Inquiries : Katzenjammer Kids’ birthday — 12 December 1897.

A forgotten novelist …

… zmkc: Battered Penguins - The Last Tresillians and A Use of Riches by J.I.M. Stewart.

The books that I have read that were written under Stewart's actual name are novels of ideas, slightly reminiscent of Angus Wilson, (who he refers to at one moment), with a faint element of Aldous Huxley's non-dystopic novels. They are dated now, in the sense that the Britain that they portray is mono-cultural, peopled almost exclusively by characters who are upper middle class - artists, academics, senior civil servants and art experts - with the occasional aristocratic Continental thrown in for a bit of colour. 

And another...

Reading Walker Percy, on times like today, and this excerpt from Love in The Ruins (1971):
 The old Republican Party has become the Knothead Party, so named during the last Republican convention in Montgomery when a change of name was proposed, the first suggestion being the Christian Conservative Constitutional Party, and campaign buttons were even printed with the letters CCCP before an Eastern-liberal commentator noted the similarity to the initials printed on the backs of the Soviet cosmonauts and called it the most knotheaded political bungle of the century—which the conservatives, in the best tradition, turned to their own advantage, printing a million more buttons reading “Knotheads for America” and banners proclaiming “No Man Can Be Too Knotheaded in the Service of His Country.” 
The old Democrats gave way to the new Left Party. They too were stuck with a nickname not of their own devising and the nickname stuck: in this case a derisive acronym that the Right made up and the Left accepted, accepted in that same curious American tradition by which we allow our enemies to name us, give currency to their curses, perhaps from the need to concede the headstart they want and still beat them, perhaps also from the secret inkling that our enemies know the worst of us best and it’s best for them to say it. LEFT usually it is, often LEFTPAPA, sometimes LEFTPAPASAN (with a little Jap bow), hardly ever the original LEFTPAPASANE, which stood for what, according to the Right, the Left believed in: Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, The Pill, Atheism, Pot, Anti-Pollution, Sex, Abortion Now, Euthanasia.
 

A Comic Catholic Novel...

And this, in the end, is why Oregon Confettis so refreshing. It represents an edgier, rowdier brand of religious literature. It takes on today’s shoddiest secular ideologies and shows the dreariness of succumbing to them, but also the appeal of making the sacrifices necessary to leave them behind. Instead of addressing a nonbelieving audience “which puts little stock in either grace or the devil,” as Flannery O’Connor put it, [Lee] Oser aims at a faithful subculture likely to share, or at the very least to sympathize with, his basic views on art, sex, and religion.
From The University Bookman 

Something to think on …

The most common characteristic of all police states is intimidation by surveillance. Citizens know they are being watched and overheard. Their mail is being examined. Their homes can be invaded.
— Vance Packard, who died on this date in 1996

Decisive event …

… The French Invasion | Quarterly Conversation. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

To hear the superlatives, one would have thought that “The Languages of Criticism and the Sciences of Man” symposium held at Johns Hopkins for a few frantic days from 18 to 21 October 1966 was the first gathering of its kind ever held. It wasn’t, but it did accomplish a feat that changed the intellectual landscape of the nation: it brought avant-garde French theory to America. In the years that followed, René Girard would champion a system of thought that was both a child of this new era and an orphan within it. He was at once proud of his role in launching the symposium, and troubled by some of its consequences. Let us consider what happened during this watershed autumn.

Monday, December 11, 2017

Upcoming Titles - Continued


This month's edition of The Literary Review includes a number of interesting titles. They are:
  • The Letters of Sylvia Plath: Volume I, 1940-1956
  • Calder: The Conquest of Time
  • The Darkening Age: The Christian Destruction of the Classical World 
  • Bread for All: The Origins of the Welfare State 
  • Travelers in the Third Reich: The Rise of Fascism through the Eyes of Everyday People 
  • Queen Victoria's Matchmaking: The Royal Marriages that Shaped Europe 
  • Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom (which is not well reviewed)
  • Time Pieces: A Dublin Memoir
Of these, The Darkening Age, A Dublin Memoir (by John Banville), and the history of Queen Victoria's progeny seem most engaging. As always with The Literary Review, the essays themselves are very well composed. This is a great publication. 

Questioning orthodoxy …

 What went wrong? | The New Criterion. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

…  to focus on Myers —the “unknown,” the “previously unpublished critic,” the jerk—is to skirt the central thesis. That is: abetted by well-placed reviewers, an idiom has taken hold of contemporary fiction, one of repetitious phrases, slack descriptions, strained metaphors, and pretentious, vapid thoughts. To prove it, Myers selects five celebrities of Serious Literature—Proulx, Don DeLillo, Cormac McCarthy, Paul Auster, and David Guterson—and meticulously analyzes their language.
Well, I have written unflatteringly of two of these writers — McCarthy and Guterson — and I started to review one of DeLillo's novels, but found it uninteresting.

Indeed …

… Why We Shouldn’t Change the Lord’s Prayer | Anthony Esolen | First Things.

The words of Jesus are clear. The original Greek is not ambiguous. There is no variant hiding in the shelves. We cannot go from an active verb, subjunctive mood, aorist tense, second person singular, with a clear direct object, to a wholly different verb—“do not allow”—completed by an infinitive that is nowhere in the text—“to fall”—without shifting from translation to theological exegesis. The task of the translator, though he should be informed by the theological, cultural, and linguistic context of the time, is to render what the words mean, literally, even (perhaps especially) when those words sound foreign to our ears.

Honored …

… A chevalier moderne: Cécile Alduy raised to glory! | The Book Haven.

When the world was serious …

… Nigeness: 'There, intact, were various objects all familiar...'

Blogging note …

I have to take my wife to a doctor's appointment. Blogging will resume later on.

Only 10 days away …

… Forgotten Poems #34: WINTER IS COMING.

Medieval murder …

… Informal Inquiries : The Moneylender of Toulouse (2008).

These really do sound excellent …

… The Best Books of 2017: Translations! | stevereads. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Something to think on …

It's a universal law — intolerance is the first sign of an inadequate education. An ill-educated person behaves with arrogant impatience, whereas truly profound education breeds humility.
— Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, born on this date in 1918

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Have a look …

 About Last Night | A little taste.

If it comes to Philly, I’ll go see it. Terry’s Satchmo at the Waldorf was great.

Just in time …

 Paul Davis On Crime: 'A Christmas Carol' Saved Dickens From Crushing Debt.

Happy birthday …

 Informal Inquiries : Emily Dickinson born on 10 December 1830.

Round and round he goes …

… One Long Circular Argument. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

… natural selection, whether among organisms or among “memes,” is sensitive to survival value alone. It “cares” nothing about the truth or falsity of our thoughts or the logical rigor of our arguments. If comforting falsehoods and fallacious reasoning happen to be conducive to our survival, then they will be selected for. They will seem right to us even if they are not. But then, if Dennett’s account of the origin of human thought processes were correct, we could have no reason to suppose that those processes track truth or conform to canons of logical inference. Again, they will appear to do so even if they do not. This undermines any confidence we could have in any idea or argument—including Dennett’s.
Given his views, it's a wonder why Dennett even bothers to think let alone share his thoughts with the rest of us. Oh, well, it's all illusory anyway, right?

Preferences and predilections …

Gained in Translation. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)
Translating literature is not always more difficult than translating other texts—tourist brochures, technical manuals, art catalogues, sales contracts, and the like. But it does have this distinguishing characteristic: its sense is not limited to a simple function of informing or persuading, but rather thrives on a superabundance of possible meanings, an openness to interpretation, an invitation to measure what is described against our experience. This is stimulating. The more we bring to it, the more it offers, with the result that later readings will be different from the first in a way that is hardly true of a product description or city guide.  

Much indeed in what he says …

… The U.S. Media Yesterday Suffered its Most Humiliating Debacle in Ages: Now Refuses All Transparency Over What Happened.

So continually awful and misleading has this reporting been that even Vladimir Putin’s most devoted critics – such as Russian expatriate Masha Gessenoppositional Russian journalists, and anti-Kremlin liberal activists in Moscow – are constantly warning that the U.S. media’s unhinged, ignorant, paranoid reporting on Russia is harming their cause in all sorts of ways, in the process destroying the credibility of the U.S. media in the eyes of Putin’s opposition (who — unlike Americans who have been fed a steady news and entertainment propaganda diet for decades about Russia — actually understand the realities of that country).
I'm so old I remember when progressives thought the world of Russia.

Inquirer reviews …

John Banville channels Henry James' 'Portrait' in beguiling 'Mrs. Osmond'.

'Bible Nation': How the Green family cornered the evangelical market.

Something to think on …

It is not in the nature of politics that the best men should be elected. The best men do not want to govern their fellowmen.
— George MacDonald, born on this date in 1824

Saturday, December 09, 2017

Christmas fundamentalists...

In case you wondered …

… Why the Humanities Must Remain Human (Or Die) | Joshua Mayo | First Things.

History, English, and language departments lurch and lumber on, but the final tire-iron to the head might be student enrollment. Data from the Education Department's Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System tells us now that fewer than 12 percent of students earning bachelor’s degrees are graduating from humanities programs. That’s a 20-percent drop over the last ten years. Of course, the decline owes something to market forces. But is it too speculative to wonder whether a defect in the humanities’ product might factor in? When diverse theoretical agendas replace the fundamental arts of truth-seeking—the glittering cosmos of great books and great ideas—it is no surprise that students want to blow this popsicle stand. “Four years of Foucault, Cixous, and Žižek? Thanks, but no thanks. I’ll shop elsewhere.”

Of blogs and blogging …

… Informal Inquiries : A small-minded Luddite resists some technology: a few thoughts about tweets, likes, and a bit more.

Judge for yourself …

… Is the Sea Level Stable at Aden, Yemen? | SpringerLink.

FYI …

… Scientifically Illiterate America | Hoover Institution.

Non-scientists are likely to be fooled or manipulated … because scientific illiteracy runs deep. A 2001 study sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation found that only about half of all people surveyed understood that the earth circles the sun once a year, while only 45 percent could give an “acceptable definition” of DNA and only 22 percent understood what a molecule was. More recent research by Jon Miller, Professor of Integrative Studies at Michigan State University, found that 70 percent of Americans cannot understand the science section of the New York Times.

Wondrous …

'Twas ever thus …

… What C.S. Lewis Can Teach Us About America's Pronoun Wars.

“Until quite modern times all teachers and even all men believed the universe to be such that certain emotional reactions on our part could be either congruous or incongruous to it — believed, in fact, that objects did not merely receive, but could merit, our approval or disapproval, our reverence or our contempt,” Lewis wrote.

Bad guys …

… Paul Davis On Crime: My Piece On Operation Regional Shield And The Transnational Criminal Gang MS-13.

Looking back …

… Kazuo Ishiguro - Nobel Lecture: My Twentieth Century Evening – and Other Small Breakthroughs. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

When I look back to this period, and remember it was less than twenty years from the end of a world war in which the Japanese had been their bitter enemies, I'm amazed by the openness and instinctive generosity with which our family was accepted by this ordinary English community. The affection, respect and curiosity I retain to this day for that generation of Britons who came through the Second World War, and built a remarkable new welfare state in its aftermath, derive significantly from my personal experiences from those years.

Art and nature …

… Zealotry of Guerin: Fog Day Painting (Julia Guerin), Sonnet #382.

Something to think on …

Why not be oneself? That is the whole secret of a successful appearance. If one is a greyhound why try to look like a Pekinese?
— Edith Sitwell, who died on this date 1964

Friday, December 08, 2017

Comprehensive chat

… Paul Davis On Crime: My Q&A With Mark Bowden, Author Of 'Hue 1968' And 'Black Hawk Down'.

Born there, like Mr. Bloom …

 A Half-National Treasure. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

From TV's dark age …

… About Last Night | Replay: William Inge’s Picnic, performed by the original cast.

Closet classicist …

… The Metamorphosis | How Bob Dylan was influenced by Homer and Ovid. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Ancient Rome has always mattered to Bob Dylan, from his teenage years when he saw films such as The RobeDemetrius and the Gladiators, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s Julius Caesar starring Marlon Brando as Mark Antony. Dylan went for free to the cinema owned by his uncle: there wasn’t much else to do in the deep winters of Hibbing up on the iron range in the far north country of Minnesota. The fifteen-year-old Dylan, then Robert (or Bobby) Zimmerman, studied Latin and joined the Latin Club in his sophomore year. 

In medias res …

… The only way up is down: Rachel Jacoff and Robert Harrison discuss Dante’s Inferno | The Book Haven.

Very often at his best …

… Galway Kinnell's poetry transformed the world, but the world has changed - LA Times. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Nonetheless, it is hard, with all that is happening in the world and especially in America this past year, to say that this is the top book of poetry I’d recommend reading right now. Contemporary readers, especially younger ones, may have a hard time swallowing optimistic secular spiritualisms like the notion that “everything flowers, from within, of self-blessing.” Perhaps not enough room is left in these poems for another kind of wisdom: the ambiguity and uncertainty that newer poetry has become very adept at conveying.
Well, better optimistic secular spiritualisms than pessimistic political religions.

Hmm …

… “Autumn” | The New Yorker. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

I'm not sure we want to learn from children whatever it was Freud is thought to have learned from them.

More bests …

… Hanukkah Gifts: 12 Books To Give Everyone – The Forward.



The Ten Best Science Books of 2017.



… The Ten Best Travel Books of 2017.



(Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

No word limit a mixed blessing …

… ‘She Lived to Read’ | Commonweal Magazine. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Definitely worth pondering …

… Informal Inquiries : James Thurber and a dog on the scent of a fearsome trail.

Seeing a world difficult to love …

… Making the Place Beautiful. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Something to think on …

I never had a dog that showed a human fear of death. Death, to a dog, is the final unavoidable compulsion, the least ineluctable scent on a fearsome trail, but they like to face it alone, going out into the woods, among the leaves, if there are any leaves when their time comes, enduring without sentimental human distraction the Last Loneliness, which they are wise enough to know cannot be shared by anyone.
— James Thurber, born on this date in 1894 

Thursday, December 07, 2017

Complements …

 Informal Inquiries : Book Reviews and Literary Criticism.

Real music …

I spent part of this afternoon with Harold. He likes short stories. So I brought him The Best of Richard Matheson, which Penguin has just brought out. Those of us who watched Twilight Zone will recognize the author's name. I like to remind myself that, while this piece was being written, I was a junior in high school. It is characteristic in its combination of unblinking introspection and genuinely heart-felt lyricism. 

In search of …

… The Transition | belz. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Distinctive sensibility …

… James Salter's posthumous collection: masterful writing, unabashedly masculine - Chicago Tribune. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

For the season …

… Paul Davis On Crime: My Crime Fiction: "A Christmas Crime Story".

RIP …

Acclaimed author William H. Gass of University City dies at 93 | Books | stltoday.com. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

The wild and the shocking …

… Philip Hensher - Twentieth-Century Elizabethan | Literary Review | Issue 460. (Ht tip, Dave Lull, )

In case you wondered …

… Best Fiction of 2017.

… Best Nonfiction of 2017.

(Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Some poems …

… Carcinogenic Poetry: G. Emil Reutter - Two Poems.



… and another: On The Rubble by G. Emil Reutter.

Hmm …

 Informal Inquiries : "Young Goodman Brown" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.



It's been a long time, but it seems to me that Goodman Brown is the type who weighs everyone in the balance but himself. His is a faith without love.

Something to think on …

The miracles of the church seem to me to rest not so much upon faces or voices or healing power coming suddenly near to us from afar off, but upon our perceptions being made finer, so that for a moment our eyes can see and our ears can hear what is there about us always.
— Willa Cather, born on this date in 1873

Wednesday, December 06, 2017

Fear no more...

Bewildering spectacle …

… D J Taylor - Author of Himself | Literary Review | Issue 460. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

In the essay on Waugh that he never lived to complete, Orwell marks this passage down as ‘an irrelevant outburst’, while noting its absolute centrality to the view Waugh held of the world. The hidebound fogeydom into which he lapsed is lavishly on display in A Little Learning. Waugh’s lapidary style and antiquated literary manners here would have made the work seem old-fashioned half a century before. The same air pervades the many interviews that John Howard Wilson and Barbara Cooke print as addenda. Although these include the famous Face to Faceinterrogation by John Freeman, perhaps the most revealing is a Frankly Speaking radio feature from 1953, in which serial teasing alternates with patently serious statements about ‘the man in the street’, the welfare state and Waugh’s Catholic faith. The most deeply felt response comes in the final exchange: ‘Mr Waugh, how, when you die, would you like to be remembered?’ ‘I should like people of their charity to pray for my soul as a sinner.’
Methinks I shall do as he asked.

Listen in …

… Episode 247 – Vanda Krefft – The Virtual Memories Show.

“The most interesting question about Fox is, ‘What do you do when you realize you’re not going to be the person that you want to be?'”

We need more such …

… Richard Wilbur’s heresy: “elegance, wit, and declaration of faith in the cosmic order” | The Book Haven.

Worrisome tale …

… About Last Night | The Levine cataclysm.

It is impossible to overstate the significance of these developments. In a very real sense, James Levine is the Met. He is the public figure most closely associated with the company, the one who has been central to its fortunes for more than four decades, and the first truly great artist to be swept up in the current maelstrom of sexual-harassment accusations. If it is proved that he did what his accusers claim, there can be no doubt that his extraordinary career will come at once to a shameful end.

Physicians and the Bard …

… The Shakespeareologists | City Journal. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

In addition to relaying in his plays many of the superstitions of his time, Shakespeare (who, as far as we know, had no medical training, though like everyone else in those times of heightened mortality, he must have had a lot of experience of disease) made many shrewd and accurate medical observations. One has only to compare them with the observations in Cures Both Empiricall and Historicall Performed upon Very Eminent Persons in Desperate Diseases, the book by his son-in-law, the university-trained physician John Hall, to realize that the medical education of the day was not necessarily an advantage in the art of seeing what was before one’s eyes. Hall’s book was a farrago of nonsense, as well as of disgusting medicaments, and whatever Hall had learned at university bore little relation to any reality external to the medical theorizing through which he then saw his patients. Unlike Hall, Shakespeare (as Dryden put it) “wanted not the spectacles of books to read Nature.” In other words, some kinds of education can be an obstacle to understanding: not, perhaps, an unfamiliar phenomenon even today.

Latter-day research …

… From letters to emails: Reading Ian McEwan’s correspondence. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Emails share much more with previous forms of communication than we usually imagine. Email-writing was initially modelled on letter-writing after all; business memos were another source of inspiration, as the subject line reminds us. Publishers’ archives are full of letters that mix private and professional matters. Even the speed of emails is not a radical innovation, as letters were delivered several times a day in the early twentieth century.

Hall of Famer …

California Hall Of Fame: Gary Snyder’s Poetry To 'Loosen Up The Heart And Mind' - capradio.org.

Gary Snyder Explains His Poem 'For All'.

(Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Some 40-odd years ago I heard Gary Snyder read at Temple University.

In memory of orchards …

… Poem of the week – Walter Osborne: Apple Gathering, Quimperlé by Frank Ormsby | Books | The Guardian. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Simplicity of life, simplicity of diction …

… On Making Oneself Less Unreadable. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

… it really doesn’t matter whether we agree with him or not. Everywhere, even when he is showy—because despite his intolerance for any form of affectation, his could be a rather ostentatious austerity—Fowler’s true love for language is always above his love for himself.
Dave also sends along this: If I Had a Sense of Beauty.


Something to think on …

The person who knows only one religion does not know any religion.
— Max Müller, born on this date in 1823

Tuesday, December 05, 2017

Chance and choice …

… Informal Inquiries : Pascal’s Wager.

RIP …

 Christine Keeler, former model at heart of Profumo affair, dies at 75 | UK news | The Guardian.

RIP …

 Christine Keeler, former model at heart of Profumo affair, dies at 75 | UK news | The Guardian.

Blogging note …

Won't be much blogging today on my part until much later. I have much to do that will take me from desk for most of the day. Maybe this evening.

For your listening pleasure …

… Paul Davis On Crime: Bob Hope Sings The Original 'Silver Bells' In 'The Lemon Drop Kid'.

Something to think on …

The positivists have a simple solution: the world must be divided into that which we can say clearly and the rest, which we had better pass over in silence. But can anyone conceive of a more pointless philosophy, seeing that what we can say clearly amounts to next to nothing? If we omitted all that is unclear, we would probably be left completely uninteresting and trivial tautologies.
— Werner Heisenberg, born on this date in 1901